Ver Noticias See the Products of Salvador Dali’s Little-Known Foray Into Glass Art

Detalles de La Noticia


1 records found in 1 pages.

See the Products of Salvador Dali’s Little-Known Foray Into Glass Art

See the Products of Salvador Dali’s Little-Known Foray Into Glass Art

See the Products of Salvador Dali’s Little-Known Foray Into Glass Art

— Benjamin Sutton


(Images via Daum/Facebook.)


Three of Salvador Dalí’s final works, the fruits of a collaboration with French glass studioDaum, don’t belong to any museums’ permanent collections (yet), but the pieces — which were made in 850 editions each under the artist’s supervision shortly before his death in 1989 — are still available from the glass-maker’s boutique on Paris’s Rue de la Paix for prices ranging from €11,340 ($14,950) to €20,210 ($26,650), Le Monde reports.




The three works — the $14,950 “Soft Watch” at top, $20,555 “Venus With Drawers” above, and $26,650 “Car debris” below — are made of bronze-encrusted molten glass, and have become increasingly sought-after since the Centre Pompidou’s blockbuster Dalí retrospective opened in November.

Though the sculptures were the mustachioed surrealist’s last collaborations with Daum, he began producing works with the storied glass studio 20 years prior, when Jacques Daum — the great-grandson of the studio’s founder — approached Dalí in hopes of recruiting a contemporary artist to test new molten glass processes.




Three of Salvador Dalí’s final works, the fruits of a collaboration with French glass studioDaum, don’t belong to any museums’ permanent collections (yet), but the pieces — which were made in 850 editions each under the artist’s supervision shortly before his death in 1989 — are still available from the glass-maker’s boutique on Paris’s Rue de la Paix for prices ranging from €11,340 ($14,950) to €20,210 ($26,650), Le Monde reports.



The three works — the $14,950 “Soft Watch” at top, $20,555 “Venus With Drawers” above, and $26,650 “Car debris” below — are made of bronze-encrusted molten glass, and have become increasingly sought-after since the Centre Pompidou’s blockbuster Dalí retrospective opened in November.

Though the sculptures were the mustachioed surrealist’s last collaborations with Daum, he began producing works with the storied glass studio 20 years prior, when Jacques Daum — the great-grandson of the studio’s founder — approached Dalí in hopes of recruiting a contemporary artist to test new molten glass processes.



“We wanted to create editions of contemporary sculptures using a wax mold process,” Daum, who died in 1987, wrote in his unpublished journal Le Monde reports. “We had to convince one of the great artists of our time.” That was easier said than done, though, because by then Dalí “was already venerated far and wide. You’d see him on television often being treated like a prince, which seemed to be perfectly natural to him.”

In 1967 Dalí and Daum produced their first edition, “The Rose is the Thing,” which was followed by another 20 before the artist’s death. After working with the artist, Daum deemed him “a genius with enormous talent, a fantastic imagination, a very vast intelligence, and, in the end, great kindness, despite the egocentric and clownish airs he puts on.”

 


This article originally appeared in:http://blogs.artinfo.com/

Obras de Arte

Yishai Jusidman
The Economist Shuffle #5
2006
oil and egg tempera on wood
Leer más...

Joseph Riera i Arago
Green Propeller Airplane
2003
Oil on canvas
Leer más...

Mateo Lopez
61 Drawings, Motorcycle Parts
2007
pencil on paper
Leer más...

Ferran García Sevilla
Sama 18
1990
Mixed media on linen
Leer más...

Joseph Riera i Arago
Ritual Water with Water Container
2002
Bronze, single casting
Leer más...

Fernando Botero
La tejedora
1990
charcoal on paper
Leer más...

Julio González
Etude pour homme cactus
1939
Ink and watercolor on paper
Leer más...

Marcelo Jiménez Santos
Xtabay
2012
acrílico sobre lienzo
Leer más...